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IQ Leaning Network

Video Library

Education Sponsors

IQ Learning Network
  • Alpha Foundation
  • Daniel Foundation of Alabama
  • Hugh Kaul Foundation
  • Monte L. Moorer Foundation
  • Sybil H. Smith Charitable Trust
Web-Interactive Field Trips
  • Alabama Humanities Foundation
    A state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities
  • Robert Meyer Foundation
  • The Stephens Foundation
  • Wells Fargo Foundation
e-Learning for Educators/ APT Learn Online
  • Community Foundation of Greater Birmingham
  • U.S. Department of Education
STEM Education Initiative
  • Ann & Alfred F. Delchamps, Jr. Charitable Fund
  • BBVA Compass Bank
  • Beverly and Gary Cooper Charitable Fund
  • Community Foundation of South Alabama
  • Corporation for Public Broadcasting
General Educational Support
  • Alabama Department of Human Resources
  • Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Alabama
  • Books-A-Million
  • Honda Manufacturing of Alabama
  • Publix
  • Wells Fargo
PBS Kids Programs
  • Alabama Power
  • Books-A-Million
  • Children's of Alabama
  • Publix
  • US Space & Rocket Center
American Graduate
  • Corporation for Public Broadcasting
Southern Education Desk
  • Corporation for Public Broadcasting

UAB in Fiji

Recommended for Third Grade to Twelfth Grade

 

Link to the UAB in Fiji Video Library
 
Link to UAB in Fiji Website
 
Interactives
 
Interactives
 
 
Social Studies - Archaeology
Archaeological Dig Curriculum (with videos)
http://www.archaeological.org/education/lessons/simulateddigs 
 
Record Sheets
 
Guidelines and standards for teachers
 
 
 
 
 
Social Studies - Anthropology
Cultural Anthropology in the Field -- Interactive Exercise from McGraw-Hill
http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072500506/student_view0/chapter2/interactive_exercise.html
 
Culture of Fiji traditional, history, people, clothing traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs http://www.everyculture.com/Cr-Ga/Fiji.html
 
Alabama Course of Study Standards
Social Studies, Grade 9-12
World Geography, Human, 2004
1.)    Explain the diversity of human characteristics in major geographic realms and regions of the world;
a. describe cultural characteristics related to language, architecture, religion, music, art, food, clothing, traditions.
 
Social Studies, Grade 9-12
Sociology, 2004
3.) a. Comparing ways in which cultures differ, change, and resist change
7.) Describe types and characteristics of groups. (Ex. Gender roles)
 
Social Studies, Grade 9-12
World Geography, Physical, 2004
1.) b. Describing location and physical shape of the world’s continents, oceans and seas
 
Science, Grade 9-12
Zoology Elective, 2005
7. Explain how species adapt to changing environments to enhance survival and reproductive success, including changes in structure, behavior, or physiology.
 
Science, Grade 9-12
Aquascience Elective, 2005
7.) Describe processes and environmental characteristics that affect growth rates of aquatic animals.
 
Social Studies, Grade 9-12
Contemporary Issues, 2004
5.) Analyze how cultural elements facilitate global understanding or misunderstanding
 
National Council for the Social Studies
National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: The Themes of Social Studies
(Copyright National Council for the Social Studies)
 
Theme 1 - CULTURE
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of culture and cultural diversity.
·         Human beings create, learn, share, and adapt to culture.
·         Through experience, observation, and reflection, students will identify elements of culture as well as similarities and differences among cultural groups across time and place
·         In schools, this theme typically appears in units and courses dealing with geography, history, sociology, and anthropology, as well as multicultural topics across the curriculum.
 
Theme 2 - TIME, CONTINUITY, AND CHANGE
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy.
·         Studying the past makes it possible for us to understand the human story across time.
·         Knowledge and understanding of the past enable us to analyze the causes and consequences of events and developments, and to place these in the context of the institutions, values and beliefs of the periods in which they took place.
·          Knowing how to read, reconstruct and interpret the past allows us to answer questions such as:    
How do we learn about the past? How can we evaluate the usefulness and degree of reliability of different historical sources? What are the roots of our social, political and economic systems? What are our personal roots and how can they be viewed as part of human history? Why is the past important to us today? How has the world changed and how might it change in future? How do perspectives about the past differ, and to what extent do these differences inform contemporary ideas and actions?
·         Children in early grades learn to locate themselves in time and space.
·         Through a more formal study of history, students in the middle grades continue to expand their understanding of the past and are increasingly able to apply the research methods associated with historical inquiry.
 
Theme 3 - PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of people, places, and environments.
·         The study of people, places, and environments enables us to understand the relationship between human populations and the physical world.
·         During their studies, learners develop an understanding of spatial perspectives, and examine changes in the relationship between peoples, places and environments.
·       Today’s social, cultural, economic and civic issues demand that students apply knowledge, skills, and understandings as they address questions such as:
Why do people decide to live where they do or move to other places? Why is location important? How do people interact with the environment and what are some of the consequences of those interactions? What physical and other characteristics lead to the creation of regions? How do maps, globes, geographic tools and geospatial technologies contribute to the understanding of people, places, and environments?
·          In schools, this theme typically appears in units and courses dealing with geography, regional studies, and world cultures.
 
Theme 4 - INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT AND IDENTITY
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of individual development and identity.
·       Personal identity is shaped by an individual’s culture, by groups, by institutional influences, and by lived experiences shared with people inside and outside the individual’s own culture throughout her or his development.
·       Questions related to identity and development, which are important in psychology, sociology, and anthropology, are central to the understanding of who we are.
·       The study of individual development and identity will help students to describe factors important to the development of personal identity.
·       In the early grades, young learners develop their personal identities in the context of families, peers, schools, and communities.
 
Theme 5 - INDIVIDUALS, GROUPS, AND INSTITUTIONS
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups, and institutions.
·       Institutions are the formal and informal political, economic, and social organizations that help us carry out, organize, and manage our daily affairs.
·       It is important that students know how institutions are formed, what controls and influences them, how they control and influence individuals and culture, and how institutions can be maintained or changed.
·       Students identify those institutions that they encounter.
·       In schools, this theme typically appears in units and courses dealing with sociology, anthropology, psychology, political science, and history.
 
Theme 6 - POWER, AUTHORITY, AND GOVERNANCE
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people create, interact with, and change structures of power, authority, and governance.
 
·       The development of civic competence requires an understanding of the foundations of political thought, and the historical development of various structures of power, authority, and governance. It also requires knowledge of the evolving functions of these structures in contemporary U.S. society, as well as in other parts of the world.
·       In exploring this theme, students confront questions such as:
What are the purposes and functions of government? Under what circumstances is the exercise of political power legitimate? What are the proper scope and limits of authority? How are individual rights protected and challenged within the context of majority rule? What conflicts exist among fundamental principles and values of constitutional democracy? What are the rights and responsibilities of citizens in a constitutional democracy?
·       Through study of the dynamic relationships between individual rights and responsibilities, the needs of social groups, and concepts of a just society, learners become more effective problem-solvers and decision-makers when addressing the persistent issues and social problems encountered in public life.
·       In schools, this theme typically appears in units and courses dealing with government, politics, political science, civics, history, law, and other social sciences.
 
Theme 7 - PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND CONSUMPTION
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people organize for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.
 
·       People have wants that often exceed the limited resources available to them.
·       In exploring this theme, students confront such questions as:
What factors influence decision-making on issues of the production, distribution and consumption of goods? What are the best ways to deal with market failures? How does interdependence brought on by globalization impact local economies and social systems?
·       Students will gather and analyze data, as well as use critical thinking skills to determine how best to deal with scarcity of resources.
·       In schools, this theme typically appears in units and courses dealing with concepts, principles, and issues drawn from the discipline of economics.
 
Theme 8 - SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of relationships among science, technology, and society.
 
·       Science, and its practical application, technology, have had a major influence on social and cultural change, and on the ways people interact with the world.
·       There are many questions about the role that science and technology play in our lives and in our cultures.
·       This theme appears in units or courses dealing with history, geography, economics, and civics and government.
·       Young children learn how science and technologies influence beliefs, knowledge, and their daily lives.
 
Theme 9 - GLOBAL CONNECTIONS
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of global connections and interdependence.
 
·       Global connections have intensified and accelerated the changes faced at the local, national, and international levels.
·       In exploring this theme, students confront questions such as:
What are the different types of global connections? What global connections have existed in the past, exist currently, and are likely in the future? How do ideas spread between societies in today’s interconnected world? How does this result in change in those societies? What are the other consequences of global connections? What are the benefits from and problems associated with global interdependence? How might people in different parts of the world have different perspectives on these benefits and problems? What influence has increasing global interdependence had on patterns of international migration? How should people and societies balance global connectedness with local needs? What is needed for life to thrive on an ever changing and increasingly interdependent planet?
·       Analyses of the costs and benefits of increased global connections, and evaluations of the tensions between national interests and global priorities, contribute to the development of possible solutions to persistent and emerging global issues.
·       This theme typically appears in units or courses dealing with geography, culture, economics, history, political science, government, and technology but may also draw upon the natural and physical sciences and the humanities, including literature, the arts, and languages.
 
·       Questions faced by students studying this theme might be:
What are the democratic ideals and practices of a constitutional democracy? What is the balance between rights and responsibilities? What is civic participation? How do citizens become involved? What is the role of the citizen in the community and the nation, and as a member of the world community? Students will explore how individuals and institutions interact. They will also recognize and respect different points of view. Students learn by experience how to participate in community service and political activities and how to use democratic processes to influence public policy.
·       In schools, this theme typically appears in units or courses dealing with civics, history, political science, cultural anthropology, and fields such as global studies and law-related education, while also drawing upon content from the humanities.

 

 

 

IQ Leaning Network

Video Library

Education Sponsors

IQ Learning Network
  • Alpha Foundation
  • Daniel Foundation of Alabama
  • Hugh Kaul Foundation
  • Monte L. Moorer Foundation
  • Sybil H. Smith Charitable Trust
Web-Interactive Field Trips
  • Alabama Humanities Foundation
    A state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities
  • Robert Meyer Foundation
  • The Stephens Foundation
  • Wells Fargo Foundation
e-Learning for Educators/ APT Learn Online
  • Community Foundation of Greater Birmingham
  • U.S. Department of Education
STEM Education Initiative
  • Ann & Alfred F. Delchamps, Jr. Charitable Fund
  • BBVA Compass Bank
  • Beverly and Gary Cooper Charitable Fund
  • Community Foundation of South Alabama
  • Corporation for Public Broadcasting
General Educational Support
  • Alabama Department of Human Resources
  • Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Alabama
  • Books-A-Million
  • Honda Manufacturing of Alabama
  • Publix
  • Wells Fargo
PBS Kids Programs
  • Alabama Power
  • Books-A-Million
  • Children's of Alabama
  • Publix
  • US Space & Rocket Center
American Graduate
  • Corporation for Public Broadcasting
Southern Education Desk
  • Corporation for Public Broadcasting